Ear rape without lube: Pledge of Allegiance to the flag

Ear Rape without lube: Pledge of Allegiance to the flag
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Ear rape without lube: the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag. The
Pledge of Allegiance was the origin of Nazi salutes and Nazi
behavior.

Another Wikipedia myth has been debunked. The myth is that the
American Nazi salute was changed via the action of Franklin
Delano Roosevelt. Many Americans have been misled by Wikipedia into
making that claim. The truth is that there is no evidence
that FDR had anything to do with ending the American Nazi salute in
the Pledge of Allegiance. FDR just happened to be president
at the time that Congress made idiotic forays into the mess. It would
make as much sense to claim that FDR promoted the American
Nazi salute in that Congress’ initial 1942 law retained the extended-
arm gesture for the Pledge of Allegiance.

June 3, 1940: In the case of Minersville School District v. Gobitis,
the Supreme Court of the United States rules that children
can be persecuted if they refuse to chant in worship of government in
unison on command daily in government schools (socialist
schools).

December 8, 1941 was the date of the US declaration of war, but in
fact the US was at war on December 7, 1941 at about 7:55 AM
when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. (Hitler declared war
against the US on December 11, 1941, in support of his
Axis agreements with Japan).

June 22, 1942: date of enactment of Pub.L. 77-623, 56 Stat. 377,
H.J.Res. 303 in which Congress, long after the U.S. entered WWII,
began idiotic attempts to dictate and alter the Pledge of Allegiance,
yet the alteration retained the extended arm salute that was the
origin of the Nazi salute. Section 7 stated: “That the pledge of
allegiance to the flag, ‘I pledge allegiance to the flag of the
United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation
indivisible, with liberty and justice for all’, be
rendered by standing with the right hand over the heart; extending the
right hand, palm upward, toward the flag at the words ‘to
the flag’ and holding this position until the end, when the hand drops
to the side. However, civilians will always show full
respect to the flag when the pledge is given by merely standing at
attention, men removing the headdress. Persons in uniform
shall render the military salute.” Note that persons in uniform
continued to use the military salute, which was the initial
salute for the earlier Pledge of Allegiance (as written by Francis
Bellamy in 1892) and which was the source of the Nazi salute
when it was extended outward to point at the flag. In practice the
second gesture was performed palm-down when the military
salute was merely stretched at the flag (see the discoveries of the
historian Dr. Rex Curry, author of “Pledge of Allegiance
Secrets”).

December 22, 1942: date of enactment of Pub.L. 77-829, 56 Stat. 1074,
H.J.Res. 359 which attempted again to alter the Pledge of
Allegiance and completely drop the extended arm salute, probably
because people continued to perform the American Nazi salute,
with the arm straight out and the palm down, as had been the habit for
so long. Section 7 stated: “That the pledge of allegiance
to the flag, ‘I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of
America and to the Republic for which it stands, one
Nation indivisible, with liberty and justice for all’, be rendered by
standing with the right hand over the heart. However,
civilians will always show full respect to the flag when the pledge is
given by merely standing at attention, men removing the
headdress. Persons in uniform shall render the military salute. Note
that persons in uniform continued to use the military
salute, which was the initial salute for the earlier Pledge of
Allegiance, and the source of the Nazi salute. Congress’ 2nd
idiotic attempt to dictate the robotic chanting ritual was ignored by
many Americans who continued to perform America’s Nazi
salute during the pledge.

June 14, 1943: in the case of West Virginia State Board of Education
v. Barnette, the Supreme Court of the United States, after
Congress had already tried to drop America’s Nazi salute, decided to
reverse the 1940 Minersville v. Gobitis decision, after the
decision had inspired violence and persecution of children (and
parents) for refusing to chant mechanically and perform
America’s Nazi salute.

Americans did not immediately drop the American Nazi salute in the
pledge. The American Nazi salute persisted into the ’50s and
’60s in some places.

 

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